The large size and external development of the frog Xenopus laevis make it an ideal system for in vivo imaging of dynamic cellular activity. Xenopus embryos are amenable to simple genetic manipulation techniques including knockdowns and misexpression, as well as transgenesis. The ease of collecting large numbers of embryos and the larger size of individual cells within an embryo as compared with other vertebrate model systems provides an excellent platform for the observation of cellular behavior and subcellular processes. In the May issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols, John Wallingford and colleagues from the University of Texas provide a suite of articles detailing live imaging of Xenopus laevis at low magnification, confocal imaging of fixed tissues, and in one of May’s featured articles, High-Magnification In Vivo Imaging of Xenopus Embryos for Cell and Developmental Biology. This protocol describes methods for labeling and high-magnification time-lapse imaging by confocal microscopy. Like all of our featured articles, it’s freely available to subscribers and non-subscribers alike.